Heroes of Healthcare

Healthcare providers may vary in the roles that they play and the places that they work; however, the professional values that they possess on holistic, empathetic, and patient-centred care often converge as similarities. Despite the dedication and long hours that are required to provide quality patient care, their acts of service and selflessness tends to go unnoticed. Heroes of Healthcare aims to recognize and show our appreciation for the numerous healthcare providers that dedicate their careers to supporting patients and their families in achieving a healthier future state.

Therese
RN
“I don’t think that anyone could have been prepared for how big of an impact COVID had, but having key learnings from past experiences like SARS was very helpful”

“My mom is a nurse and she always talked about what a rewarding feeling it was to be able to help someone who is very ill - to see their recovery and be there for their family. That really influenced my decision to go into healthcare and become a nurse. I worked in primary care and provided vaccinations to a wide range of age groups but I spent most of my time as a nurse working in Cardiovascular Surgery. When the pandemic hit, there was a big call to action for nurses to help out in any way that they can so I worked in Assessment Centres and helped to screen frontline workers and the general population. From this experience, I learned to be adaptive and responsive to everything that’s going around you… you may not always know if what you’re doing is the most correct but it may be the most correct for now.”

“I don’t think that anyone could have been prepared for how big of an impact COVID had, but having key learnings from past experiences like SARS was very helpful”

“My mom is a nurse and she always talked about what a rewarding feeling it was to be able to help someone who is very ill - to see their recovery and be there for their family. That really influenced my decision to go into healthcare and become a nurse. I worked in primary care and provided vaccinations to a wide range of age groups but I spent most of my time as a nurse working in Cardiovascular Surgery. When the pandemic hit, there was a big call to action for nurses to help out in any way that they can so I worked in Assessment Centres and helped to screen frontline workers and the general population. From this experience, I learned to be adaptive and responsive to everything that’s going around you… you may not always know if what you’re doing is the most correct but it may be the most correct for now.”

Therese
RN
Avneet
RN
"Even now, I am just beginning to realize that what I held as small gestures, such as holding a patient’s hand or offering a few words signifying that I am there for them, can go a long way in that patient's journey."

“I’m a registered nurse working in a busy emergency department (ED) for the past three and a half years. What I enjoy most in my current role is the dynamic environment I work in, as well as feeling like I’m able to make a difference in a person’s life. In the emergency department, we care for anyone from varying developmental ages - from newborns to older adults. Each day isn’t mundane and we see people presenting with various health problems such as psychiatric issues, abdominal pain, traumas, and cardiac arrests. I like coming into work knowing each day can be wildly different from the previous day and the ED is always chaotic and ever-changing! It’s a type of environment where I’m forced to expand my critical thinking because I am adapting and learning something new everyday.

While being a registered nurse is often draining, it can also be rewarding. When we are able to successfully resuscitate a patient, for example, I am in awe of how our healthcare team collectively worked together to save a life and it’s a very sobering reminder of how life-changing these moments are for the patient and their family members down the hall. It’s also very heartwarming when patients and their family point out the positive impact we made in their lives by providing them with prompt care, listening, and advocating for them. Even now, I am just beginning to realize that what I held as small gestures, such as holding a patient’s hand or offering a few words signifying that I am there for them, can go a long way in that patient's journey.

I have endless gratitude for being in a career where I’m always learning and seeing how healthcare providers can impact people’s lives when we’re given the ability to practice compassionately and safely.”

"Even now, I am just beginning to realize that what I held as small gestures, such as holding a patient’s hand or offering a few words signifying that I am there for them, can go a long way in that patient's journey."

“I’m a registered nurse working in a busy emergency department (ED) for the past three and a half years. What I enjoy most in my current role is the dynamic environment I work in, as well as feeling like I’m able to make a difference in a person’s life. In the emergency department, we care for anyone from varying developmental ages - from newborns to older adults. Each day isn’t mundane and we see people presenting with various health problems such as psychiatric issues, abdominal pain, traumas, and cardiac arrests. I like coming into work knowing each day can be wildly different from the previous day and the ED is always chaotic and ever-changing! It’s a type of environment where I’m forced to expand my critical thinking because I am adapting and learning something new everyday.

While being a registered nurse is often draining, it can also be rewarding. When we are able to successfully resuscitate a patient, for example, I am in awe of how our healthcare team collectively worked together to save a life and it’s a very sobering reminder of how life-changing these moments are for the patient and their family members down the hall. It’s also very heartwarming when patients and their family point out the positive impact we made in their lives by providing them with prompt care, listening, and advocating for them. Even now, I am just beginning to realize that what I held as small gestures, such as holding a patient’s hand or offering a few words signifying that I am there for them, can go a long way in that patient's journey.

I have endless gratitude for being in a career where I’m always learning and seeing how healthcare providers can impact people’s lives when we’re given the ability to practice compassionately and safely.”

Avneet
RN
Fraser
MD CANDIDATE
“As much as I’d like to say that I feel safe and that I won’t get COVID, that’s not the case and it’s very scary to go into the hospital everyday. But I know that I am making a difference.”

“I am a Canadian studying abroad at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. My grandma was diagnosed with cancer when I was 11 years old and following her care made me think about medicine as a career. I was initially scared because those are huge shoes to fill but in the years subsequent to that, I got involved in many volunteer and research opportunities. Some people go into medicine for intellectual stimulation and some because it’s a fascinating puzzle, but for me it was really about the patient contact. COVID has made a large impact, we don't get to see our patients’ faces and they don’t get to see ours. In less than a year, it’s really transformed the ways in which we provide care But one of the most special things about being a doctor is that it is really a privilege to be brought into someone’s life when they are at their most vulnerable. I think it’s very special to be involved and trusted to try to make a difference and potentially cure them.

It’s a crazy time and as much as I’d like to say that I feel safe and that I won’t get COVID, that’s not the case and it’s very scary to go into the hospital everyday. But I know that I am making a difference, sometimes you just need to compartmentalize that and think about the bigger picture.

Everyone’s probably heard this a million times but please, wash your hands and wear a mask -that’s all I ask. Follow the guidelines as they’re based on clinical evidence, we’re trying to do this to keep the community safe. I understand that it’s really hard being isolated from friends and family for so long. I’m not coming home for Christmas and this will be the first Christmas ever that I will not be with family but know that you’re not alone.”

“As much as I’d like to say that I feel safe and that I won’t get COVID, that’s not the case and it’s very scary to go into the hospital everyday. But I know that I am making a difference.”

“I am a Canadian studying abroad at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. My grandma was diagnosed with cancer when I was 11 years old and following her care made me think about medicine as a career. I was initially scared because those are huge shoes to fill but in the years subsequent to that, I got involved in many volunteer and research opportunities. Some people go into medicine for intellectual stimulation and some because it’s a fascinating puzzle, but for me it was really about the patient contact. COVID has made a large impact, we don't get to see our patients’ faces and they don’t get to see ours. In less than a year, it’s really transformed the ways in which we provide care But one of the most special things about being a doctor is that it is really a privilege to be brought into someone’s life when they are at their most vulnerable. I think it’s very special to be involved and trusted to try to make a difference and potentially cure them.

It’s a crazy time and as much as I’d like to say that I feel safe and that I won’t get COVID, that’s not the case and it’s very scary to go into the hospital everyday. But I know that I am making a difference, sometimes you just need to compartmentalize that and think about the bigger picture.

Everyone’s probably heard this a million times but please, wash your hands and wear a mask -that’s all I ask. Follow the guidelines as they’re based on clinical evidence, we’re trying to do this to keep the community safe. I understand that it’s really hard being isolated from friends and family for so long. I’m not coming home for Christmas and this will be the first Christmas ever that I will not be with family but know that you’re not alone.”

Fraser
MD CANDIDATE